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Best Courses

10 Best Web Development Courses to Take in 2022

Want to learn how to build websites? I’ve found the best web development courses available online.

In this article, I will take you through a list of the best web development courses available online. Building this ranking required significant research, so I joined forces with a friend developer to create it. We followed a well-defined methodology that you can find below.

But if you want to jump straight to the results, here are our top 10 picks. You can click on a course to jump to the corresponding section:

Course Workload In Brief
1. CS50’s Web Programming with Python and JavaScript (Harvard) 25 hours Rich, detailed and overall a well-built course for intermediate learners
2. HTML, CSS, and Javascript for Web Developers (Johns Hopkins) 40 hours Great for understanding the concepts as well as applying them in real-life
3. Introduction to HTML5 (Michigan) 13 hours Excellent for building a strong foundation in HTML
4. Responsive Web Design (freeCodeCamp) 300 hours For those who want to get hands-on coding practice right away 
5. Introduction to Web Development (UC Davis) 25 hours Well-paced course for beginners to learn the basics
6. Introduction to Web Development with HTML, CSS, JavaScript (IBM) 20 hours Crisp and concise with a focus on cloud application development
7. Responsive Website Basics: Code with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (University of London) 25 hours Main concepts and coding practice fitted neatly into one course
8. Full-Stack Web Development with React (HKUST) 36 hours Elaborate course with a perfect balance of theory and practice
9. Programming Foundations with JavaScript, HTML and CSS (Duke) 35 hours For those who want to learn the basics of computer programming first
10. HTML5 and CSS Fundamentals (W3C) 15–20 hours Good for learning the key concepts following correct Web standards

What is Web Development?

Web development is simply the process of creating websites and putting them online. Websites can range from single static pages of plain text to complex interactive web applications. Web development requires the basic understanding of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, the three technologies at the heart of the Web.

Web development has been a rapidly growing industry. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that there will be a 13 percent increase in web development job opportunities from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average growth rate for all occupations.

According to the Future of Jobs Report published by the World Economic Forum, web development is one of the top-10 specialized but versatile skills, and it’s expected to remain so through 2025 at least.

Course Ranking Methodology

To create this ranking, we followed a three-step process:

First, since I’m a content writer at Class Central, the leading search engine for online courses, I started by leveraging our catalog of close to 60K courses.

With my developer friend Manoel, I scoured our database to put together a preliminary selection of courses. I took into account factors like reviews, ratings, enrollments, bookmarks, and more.

In short: I narrowed down the options by looking at well-defined metrics.

Second, I used my experience as an online learner to evaluate each preliminary pick.

Metrics such as course ratings rarely tell the whole story. I am a Guided Project Instructor at Coursera, and I have taken over 50 online courses in various subjects. My experience as an online learner and teacher has given me some perspective on what to look for in an online course. I used my experience to evaluate each preliminary pick. 

In short: I combed through my picks to arrive at a near-final selection.

Third, I expanded this selection to include other valuable resources I’ve come across.

Since there are long-established courses in most topics, more recent courses on the same topic can go unnoticed. But sometimes, more recent courses improve upon the well-established ones. So I made sure to include those when possible.

In short: I rounded up my picks with excellent but less well-known courses.

The end result is a unique selection of courses that combines a decade of Class Central data and my own experience as an online learner to try to get the best of both worlds. So far, I’ve spent more than 12 hours building this list, and I’ll continue to update it.

Course Ranking Statistics

Here are some statistics regarding this course ranking:

  • Combined, these courses have accrued over 4M enrollments.
  • All ten courses are free or free-to-audit.
  • The most-represented course provider in the ranking is Coursera, with seven courses.
  • Combined, these courses have been bookmarked over 61,970 times on Class Central, while the web development subject itself has been bookmarked over 203,200 times.
  • The most-popular course in the ranking has over 1M enrollments by itself.

So without further ado, let’s get to my picks for the best web development online courses.

1. CS50’s Web Programming with Python and JavaScript (Harvard University)

Brian Yu, instructor of the course

My first pick for best web development online course is CS50’s Web Programming with Python and JavaScript, offered by Harvard University on edX.

This course is a follow-up to Harvard’s legendary CS50, Introduction to Computer Science, one of the most popular MOOCs of all time. And a great thing about this course is that you can take it for free through Harvard OCW — it even includes a free certificate of completion!

Carrying forward CS50’s legacy, this course is taught by Brian Yu, who used to be CS50 head TA, and who’s every bit as talented as a teacher as Prof. Malan, CS50 course instructor.

In this course, you’ll dive into the design and creation of web applications with Python, JavaScript, and SQL using frameworks like Django, React, and Bootstrap.

You’ll develop your web development skills by working on a number of projects throughout the course, including an open-ended final project where you’ll have the chance to create a website of your own!

What You’ll Learn

You’ll start by taking a closer look at HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), the languages used to build websites and make them look nice. Then, you’ll be introduced to Git, a tool very commonly used in web development to take snapshots of your code (and avoid losing it in case of system failure!).

After that, you’ll dive deeper into Python, a popular programming language used, among others, to create web applications, and you’ll explore its more advanced features. You’ll focus primarily on using it to create dynamic web applications using a web framework known as Django.

You’ll learn about Django’s ability to handle data. By working with SQL, models, and migrations, you’ll create interactive web applications that use a database.

You’ll move on to JavaScript, the language used alongside HTML and CSS to build dynamic and interactive web pages.

Then you’ll explore how to test so that it works properly and in accordance with industry standards. You’ll touch upon continuous integration and continuous delivery, also known as CI/CD, so that you can quickly update your code when you make any changes.

And finally, you’ll finish the course with the concepts of scalability and security. These are important considerations when you want to put it on the web for everyone to use.

To top it all off, you’ll also get the chance to put what you learned into practice by building web applications of your own!

How You’ll Learn

The course is broken down into 9 lectures. The lectures range from 1 to 2 hours. Concepts are taught through a combination of videos and readings. Since some of the lectures can be long and exhausting, I suggest watching them in segments and learning at your own pace.

The lectures consist of both brief theoretical explanations and a lot of interactive programming examples. Reading materials include notes, slides, and source code.

Like David Malan, Brian Yu is a really talented instructor that gives clear explanations well supported through visuals. The course has amazing production values: we’re a far cry from the blurry powerpoints of some of the early and not-so-good online courses.

In terms of assessments, there are 6 projects in total, including the project at the end of the course.

The final is a great opportunity for you to reflect on all that you’ve learned – from HTML to integrating a database into your web app – and build a dynamic website of your own! Apart from a few constraints, you’re free to choose the look and feel of your website.

Note that you’ll need a GitHub account to submit your projects. So in this course, you’ll both learn about Git and GitHub and use them in practice!

Institution Harvard University
Provider edX
Instructor Brian Yu, David J. Malan
Level Intermediate
Workload 25 hours
Enrollments 1M
Certificate Free and Paid

Fun Facts

  • CS50 started as a single course; now it has expanded to a lineup of 10 courses.
  • Besides this course, Brian Yu also teaches CS50’s artificial intelligence course.
  • CS50 Web is one of the select few courses on edX to have reached over 1 million enrollments.
  • This course has been bookmarked close to 6K times on Class Central!

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

2. HTML, CSS, and Javascript for Web Developers (Johns Hopkins University)

Yaakov Chaikin, instructor of the course

My second pick for the best web development online course is HTML, CSS, and Javascript for Web Developers, offered by Johns Hopkins University on Coursera.

What’s unique about this course is that it’s not just about learning the fundamentals of web development; it’s about putting your knowledge into practice in the context of real-world applications. You’ll be able to understand the “why” behind all that you learn.

So even if you’re already familiar with web development, you’ll still have the opportunity to learn something new by contextualizing your knowledge.

By the end of the course, you’ll be able to create a real website that will work across all devices, all by yourself.

What You’ll Learn

You’ll start from the ground up by learning how to use HTML, CSS, and Bootstrap (the most widely used CSS framework today) to create modern web pages.

You’ll then learn how to code your web page so that everything rearranges and resizes automatically according to the size of the user’s screen, be it a smartphone or a desktop. You’ll make your design “responsive” — a must nowadays, since many internet users are on phones.

Finally, you’ll finish the course exploring the most popular language of the web: JavaScript. Using Javascript, you’ll build a fully functional web application that utilizes Ajax.

What Ajax does is that it allows only parts of a webpage to be updated. For instance, when you’re navigating a website, the navigation bar remains the same; only the main content changes. Ajax reloads only the main content, thus saving bandwidth and making the webpage more snappy!

Put differently, Ajax is used to retrieve data from the server and then dynamically update the content without having to reload the whole page. Efficient!

How You’ll Learn

This course is broken down into 5 weeks. Each week involves 2 to 3 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of short videos and a few readings.

Theory and programming examples are well balanced, with a focus on real-world applications.

Regarding assessments, each week includes lots of practice exercises. Week 1 has a final graded quiz, but the rest of the weeks have one peer-graded assignment each.

What’s cool about this course is that Yaakov Chaikin will actually take you on a field trip to a local business in Baltimore (virtually of course!), which doesn’t have a good website, and you’ll build a real website for that business from scratch!

Note that you’ll need a GitHub account to submit your projects. This is true for many Johns Hopkins computer science courses, and GitHub is a very popular tool in web development anyways, so it’s well worth creating a free account.

Institution Johns Hopkins University
Provider Coursera
Instructor Yaakov Chaikin
Level Mixed
Workload 40 hours
Enrollments 682K
Rating 4.7 / 5.0 (13K)
Certificate Paid

One Thing to Note

This is an old course, but the fundamentals are solid, and that matters most. It uses an older version of Bootstrap (Bootstrap 3), but if you understand version 3, you can easily work with version 5. The principles behind web development remain largely the same.

Fun Facts

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

3. Introduction to HTML5 (University of Michigan)

Colleen van Lent, instructor of the course

My third pick for the best web development online course is Introduction to HTML5, offered by the University of Michigan on Coursera.

If you’re looking for a course that teaches you the absolute basics of HTML5 (and when I say “absolute basics”, I mean it), then this is the one for you!

Unlike other courses that shower you with jargon and confusing code, this course walks you through each and every detail so that you can progressively learn how to write syntactically correct code. But even if you’re someone who’s already familiar with HTML, you’ll likely still learn something new in this course.

Another sensible addition that makes this course stand out from the crowd is that it emphasizes accessibility: making your web usable for everyone. This is an important topic too often overlooked in web development courses.

Keep in mind that after you complete this course, you’ll not be leaving as a full-fledged developer but as someone who can understand and write code. This course is about learning the proper syntax of HTML5, and styling is not covered. But the course will leave you in a great spot to be able to take more advanced courses and further your knowledge.

What You’ll Learn

In the first week, you’ll understand how URLs (the addresses of web pages) work when you type them into your web browser. You’ll take a look at the tools you need for coding, such as editors, browsers, and different software tools. You’ll end the week with some HTML5 concepts and the evolution of web design languages. There’s almost no coding in Week 1.

The second week is more about code than theory. You’ll understand the Document Object Model (DOM), the tree-like model upon which all websites are built, and learn to use contextual tags and headings in HTML. You’ll also learn about links, images, lists, tables and multimedia to add video or audio to your webpage.

In the third week, you’ll learn to validate your code — that is, to check if it’s syntactically correct. You’ll also learn about accessibility, and finally, you’ll understand how to register the domain name of your website and host your website on the web. So it’s a really end-to-end course!

After learning all this, you’ll work on a final project where you’ll put all your knowledge together to create a syntactically valid multipage website, and ensure that it is valid and accessible.

How You’ll Learn

This course is broken down into 3 weeks. Each week involves about 3 hours of work. Concepts are taught through a combination of videos and lots of weekly readings.

As for the videos, some of them are in lecture format, which you can watch anywhere. But some are in demo format, where you have to follow along and test out your code on your computer while watching the videos. The key to success in this course is in writing code.

Most of the readings are links to a free online textbook and some other online articles.

Weekly assessments are typically in the form of graded quizzes. There’s also a final peer-reviewed assignment at the end of the course. This assignment is pretty simple: you’ll have to create a valid webpage using your knowledge of HTML tags.

Institution University of Michigan
Provider Coursera
Instructor Colleen van Lent
Level Beginner
Workload 13 hours
Enrollments 453K
Rating 4.7 / 5.0 (25K)
Certificate Paid

One Thing to Note

You might want to have a CodePen account (it’s a coding playground) to try out writing code snippets and see how they’d look in the browser, but this is completely optional.

Fun Facts

  • After you complete this course, you’ll get a link to a “Secret Video” (you can find it under the Instructor’s Note on your course homepage). But I won’t give you any spoilers!
  • This course is the first of five courses of the Web Design for Everybody: Basics of Web Development & Coding Specialization.
  • Colleen van Lent previously worked as an Associate Professor at California State University and has also worked at NASA JPL, the Naval Research Lab, and the NSA.
  • Colleen has published three books for children, “Web Design with HTML”, “Web Design with HTML”, and “Making a Web Page” (co-authored with her son).

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

4. Responsive Web Design (freeCodeCamp)

Preview of the cat photo app you’ll build in the first lesson

My fourth pick for best web development online course is Responsive Web Design, offered exclusively by freeCodeCamp!

This course is all about the two languages of the web: HTML and CSS.

This freeCodeCamp course is different from the usual online courses. It doesn’t have lecture videos that you can watch. Instead, it’s all about pure coding and dynamic hands-on practice!

Once you click on a lesson, it will take you to a series of fun coding exercises. The exercises explain the concept and give instructions on the task to be completed. They are mostly short and simple, but a little tricky at times too.

The screen is divided into two parts: on the left are the instructions and programming console, on the right you’ll see the output of your code. So basically, it’s a dynamic interface; no need to set up a local development environment to run your code — you can do it all in the browser!

What You’ll Learn

You’ll start off by coding some HTML. And to make it cuter, you’ll be making a cat photo app! Step by step, you’ll add one HTML element after another, and your app is ready!

Next up is CSS, so no more boring webpages! Now you’ll be able to add colors, change font style and size, and design your webpage to make it look more attractive.

You’ll then build simple HTML forms and also use some new CSS tools to style your page.

Next, you’ll learn the CSS box model. “Box” is the spacing and border around every HTML element. You’ll also use Flexbox so that the elements on your webpage resize themselves to fit any screen size, and your webpage looks great on any device.

You’ll touch upon typography to style your text, and then move on to accessibility. It’s important that your webpage is not just syntactically correct but also comfortable for everyone to use — most notably, people that might have a disability.

There’s more CSS: CSS pseudo selectors that change specific HTML elements, intermediate CSS and further CSS practice, and more responsive web design exercises to make your webpage resize automatically.

You’ll also use CSS variables to organize your styles and reuse them. You’ll understand how to control the rows and columns in your webpage using CSS Grid.

Finally, you’ll see how you can actually transform HTML elements by rotating and scaling them to make them look appealing to the user. You’ll use this to make a cute little penguin! And did you know that you can animation to your CSS too? Yes, you’ll learn about that too.

How You’ll Learn

This course is broken down into 5 “courses”, but not necessarily as weeks. Each such “course” has 2 to 4 sub-courses, and each sub-course contains around 20 to over 100 coding exercises. There are no separate readings like in other online courses. Everything is presented in the exercises themselves.

The whole course involves about 300 hours of work, though depending on your background and on how feature-complete you want your projects to be, it could take you a lot less time. 

Concepts are taught through a combination of simple and intermediate coding exercises. The amount of exercises can feel overwhelming, but it’s worth taking your time to finish them. They all build on each other.

After each “course”, you’ll have to complete one Certification Project, which means 5 projects in total. Once you successfully complete them, you’ll be able to view your course completion certificate — entirely free.

Note that freeCodeCamp certificates are not downloadable, and can only be viewed on the web.

Provider freeCodeCamp
Level Beginner
Workload 300 hours
Rating 4.6 / 5.0
Certificate Free

Fun Facts

  • This course is the Beta version of the previous Responsive Web Design Certification course. The curriculum is slightly different, but the certificate is common to both. The beta version is a nice improvement — it’s even more hands-on!
  • Even though there are no video lectures in this course, you can still find hints to solve the exercises in the companion forum which even contains some explanatory videos. So no worries even if you get stuck!

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

5. Introduction to Web Development (University of California, Davis)

Daniel Randall, instructor of the course

My fifth pick for the best web development online course is Introduction to Web Development, offered by the University of California, Davis on Coursera.

This course is for complete beginners who want to learn the basic principles of web development.

After completing this course, you’ll be able to understand and write basic code in the languages of the web – HTML, CSS, and JavaScript – to create dynamic websites of your own.

No matter how little your technical knowledge currently is, this course will prepare you for further studies in web development if you want to take more advanced courses or specializations. 

Anyone can take this course and use it as a stepping stone to building larger and more complex websites!

What You’ll Learn

Week 1 is all about website structure and web hosting. You’ll learn the jargon and common abbreviations of web development, proceed to hosting your website, and learn about client and server-side development techniques.

In Week 2, you’ll explore the base language behind all websites: HTML. You’ll be able to identify HTML tags and code, and explore styles applied to HTML to change how it looks.

You’ll learn to set up templates for HTML, create links, format text, and work with images you want to put on your webpages.

Next up is JavaScript in Week 3. This is the language that makes websites dynamic! You’ll start by writing simple JavaScript programs while learning its fundamental syntax.

You’ll work through JavaScript alerts and prompts, and events (typically specific user interactions with your websites, such as clicking or typing). You’ll also learn how to gather user input, and dynamically modify HTML using JavaScript. Finally, you’ll practice testing your JavaScript programs.

Week 4 covers the styling part of web development: CSS. While HTML and JavaScript form the skeleton of a webpage, it’s CSS that makes it interactive and pretty. You’ll learn the different design principles, compare and contrast how we use CSS in the form of inline, internal and external CSS code, and practice CSS coding online.

You’ll be able to make the webpage less boring by adding colors and control page layouts. You’ll work with pixels, and create attractive tables using CSS.

In Week 5, you’ll learn to make web forms using HTML. You’ll put into practice all that you’ve learned in the previous weeks to create an HTML form. These are widely used on the internet.

You’ll code simple forms, and validate your user input using JavaScript. You’ll also discuss the usage of specific HTML elements such as buttons, and how you may interface with them using JavaScript.

Finally, in Week 6, you’ll explore the basics of designing web applications. You’ll be able to create dynamic webpages for users to interact with. You’ll learn the differences between client-side and server-side web development, define what “full stack” is, and understand the basic JavaScript loops such as the “while” and “for” loops.

After learning all this, you’ll have taken a big step toward becoming a proficient web dev!

How You’ll Learn

The course is broken down into 6 weeks. Each week involves 3 to 4 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of short videos and readings.

Readings are in the form of external links meant to provide additional support as you take the course.

Weekly assessments are typically in the form of graded quizzes. There’s also a final peer-reviewed project.

In this project, you’ll utilize all that you’ve learned in the course to create an HTML form on any topic of your choice. You’ll need to apply HTML, CSS, images and JavaScript validation, as well as different types of form input in your form.

Institution University of California, Davis
Provider Coursera
Instructor Daniel Randall
Level Beginner
Workload 25 hours
Enrollments 191K
Rating 4.7 / 5.0 (3K)
Certificate Paid

Fun Facts

  • Daniel Randall has co-authored the Java Web Services Certification Exam for Sun Microsystems.
  • He was also the technical editor for the book “Think Like a Programmer”.

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

6. Introduction to Web Development with HTML, CSS, JavaScript (IBM)

Upkar Lidder, instructor of the course

My sixth pick for the best web development online course is Introduction to Web Development with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, offered by IBM on Coursera.

This course is slightly different from the previous web development courses that we saw till now. Why? Because this course focuses on building your own cloud applications!

Cloud applications are similar to regular websites, but work with cloud services such as cloud-based back-end infrastructure, cloud-based data storage and data processing, and other cloud services. This can make them easier to make, scalable, and robust, so many developers favor cloud apps nowadays.

Today, we rely on cloud-based applications more than ever for everything from online shopping to remote work. This means that this field presents a large collection of career-relevant skills.

What You’ll Learn

This course is all about programming for the cloud. You’ll learn about the languages, frameworks and tools that are used to build interactive cloud applications. You’ll also take a look at the different types of developers (front-end, back-end, and full-stack), and learn common terms and skills needed to become a cloud developer.

You’ll then understand how to build the structure of your application using HTML, and add styles to it using CSS. Then you’ll move on to the different elements of HTML5. These elements help you create the structure of your website such as headers and footers, sections, date and time, numbers and much more.

Next, you’ll learn JavaScript to increase the interactivity of your application. You’ll be able to add features like forms and slideshows to make it more dynamic.

To be able to store and keep track of your project files, you’ll learn to use Git, GitHub and GitLab. These are popular tools used by developers to collaborate and control large software projects.

How You’ll Learn

The course is broken down into 6 weeks. Each week involves 2 to 3 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of short videos and readings. 

There are also plugins and external tools for you to get hands-on practice on what you’ve learned. These are ungraded and are meant to help you strengthen your skills.

In the final week of this course, you’ll build an app for a fictitious organization. You’ll apply all the knowledge you’ve gained throughout the course to build this app. This will be a peer-graded assignment, so make sure you’ve done everything correctly.

Note that you’ll need a GitHub account to submit this project. So in this course, you’ll not only learn about Git and GitHub but also put them to use!

Institution IBM
Provider Coursera
Instructor Upkar Lidder
Level Beginner
Workload 20 hours
Enrollments 20K
Rating 4.5 / 5.0
Certificate Paid

Fun Facts

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

7. Responsive Website Basics: Code with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (University of London)

Matthew Yee-King (left) and Marco Gillies (right), co-instructors of the course

My seventh pick for the best web development online course is Responsive Website Basics: Code with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, offered by the University of London International Programmes and Goldsmiths, and the University of London on Coursera.

Let me tell you beforehand that Matthew Yee-King is one of the most fun instructors you’ll ever come across (I mean, just look how cool he looks!). And what more do you need if you have cool teachers? You’ll immediately take a liking to web development!

This course is co-authored by Matthew Yee-King, Marco Gillies, and Kate Devlin.

What You’ll Learn

In the first week, you’ll learn HTML. You’ll take a look at how to set up a web development environment, build a navbar, embed images, and create lists using HTML.

The second week covers CSS. You’ll learn how to link external CSS files to your HTML, change fonts and text layout, and use CSS to customize hyperlink formatting. You’ll install the bootstrap library and create a responsive grid layout.

Then, you’ll get your feet wet in JavaScript in the third week. You’ll write simple JavaScript code allowing user interaction — through clicks, among others. You’ll learn JavaScript functions and even write functions of your own!

The final week dives deeper into JavaScript. You’ll learn to use JavaScript variables, write if statements (if statements tell the program which path to take according to a given condition), and use boolean variables (variables that can only contain the two values: true and false) in those if statements.

You’ll also learn to write JavaScript code that’s a bit more difficult to develop more complex applications.

How You’ll Learn

The course is broken down into 4 weeks. Each week involves 2 to 3 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of short videos and readings.

There are ample practice quizzes in each module. These are ungraded, but will help you test your understanding before attempting the graded quizzes.

Along with a graded quiz, each week has a peer-graded assignment. These assignments are simple coding exercises on the topics you’ve learned that week.

Institution University of London
Provider Coursera
Instructor Matthew Yee-King, Marco Gillies, Kate Devlin
Level Beginner
Workload 25 hours
Enrollments 175K
Rating 4.6 / 5.0 (5.8K)
Certificate Paid

Fun Fact

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

8. Full-Stack Web Development with React (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

Jogesh K. Muppala, instructor of the course

My eighth pick for the best web development online course is Full-Stack Web Development with React, offered by The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology on Coursera.

This old-school course is rather elaborate, with a particular focus on React. React is a very popular front-end JavaScript library for building user interfaces (UIs). With React, you can create interactive UIs effortlessly.

In order to successfully complete this course, it is recommended that you have a working knowledge of Bootstrap 4 and JavaScript. One thing to note: this course uses React v16.3.0.

What You’ll Learn

You’ll begin the course with an introduction to front-end JavaScript frameworks and libraries. You’ll be introduced to React and its components, followed by the different types of components and single-page applications of React router.

Then you’ll move on to controlled and uncontrolled forms, and understand form validation in React applications. You’ll take a look at the Flux architecture pattern and understand how Redux helps realizing it.

You’ll dive deeper into Redux by learning about Redux action, combining reducers, and Redux thunk. The course also teaches you about client-server communication using Fetch and the REST API.

Then you’ll learn how you can apply animations to your application using React. And finally, you’ll end the course by testing, building, and deploying your React applications.

How You’ll Learn

The course is broken down into 4 weeks. Each week involves 3 to 5 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of videos and readings.

Unlike many courses, almost half of the videos in each week are dedicated to theory. The instructor, Jogesh K. Muppala, describes each and every concept using slides, and demonstrates all the exercises step-by-step.

In addition to the videos, the readings provide clear explanations of each exercise using code snippets.

Your performance will be evaluated solely on the basis of peer-graded assignments each week. These assignments test your understanding of the concepts taught in that module.

Institution The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Provider Coursera
Instructor Jogesh K. Muppala
Level Intermediate
Workload 36 hours
Enrollments 148K
Rating 4.7/5.0 (3.1K)
Certificate Paid

Fun Facts

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

9. Programming Foundations with JavaScript, HTML, and CSS (Duke University)

Owen Astrachan, Susan H. Rodger, Robert Duvall (all three in the back) and Andrew D. Hilton, instructors of the course

My ninth pick for the best web development online course is Programming Foundations with JavaScript, HTML and CSS, offered by Duke University on Coursera.

If you’re someone who wants to learn programming from the ground up before starting your web development journey, then you’ve found your course!

Not only will this course teach you how to code in HTML, CSS and JavaScript, the languages of the web, it will actually first explain to you the basics of programming itself. Once you’ve grasped the key concepts, you’ll be able to move on to web development programming.

What You’ll Learn

You’ll begin the course by taking a look at HTML and understanding the concepts of algorithms and programming. You’ll learn to program in HTML and add images, links and lists to build your own webpage and style it using CSS.

You’ll learn the basic concepts of programming such as variables, methods, functions, loops, and conditionals. You’ll also understand and implement the green screen algorithm.

You’ll apply your newly learned knowledge of programming to JavaScript to make your webpage more interactive. You’ll use different features such as buttons in your webpage and make a green screen webpage. Finally, you’ll learn to apply image filters on the web.

How You’ll Learn

The course is broken down into 4 weeks. Each week involves 5 to 8 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of short videos and readings.

The theory behind each concept is concisely explained using simple slides throughout the course. Each week has practice as well as graded quizzes to test your understanding.

At the end of Week 4, there is an additional Honors section. Completing this will add a special Honors badge on your certificate (if you’re paying for one). The Honors assignment is optional, and you’ll get the usual certificate if you complete the course but not the Honors section.

Institution Duke University
Provider Coursera
Instructor Owen Astrachan, Susan H. Rodger, Robert Duvall, Andrew D. Hilton
Level Beginner
Workload 35 hours
Enrollments 480K
Rating 4.6 / 5.0 (13.3K)
Certificate Paid

Fun Fact

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

10. HTML5 and CSS Fundamentals (W3C)

Marwa Hussein, co-instructor of the course

My tenth pick for the best web development online course is HTML5 and CSS Fundamentals, offered by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) on edX.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international community that works to develop Web standards and lead the Web to its full potential.

Coming from W3C itself, this course is bound to be a dependable source for you to learn the key languages of web development: HTML, CSS and JavaScript, following the latest Web standards.

What You’ll Learn

This course will teach you how to write basic HTML, CSS and JavaScript code. You’ll start off by building your very first webpage in simple HTML5. You’ll learn the fundamentals of HTML, how to add images and hyperlinks using HTML, while following the best practices of web development such as accessibility.

You’ll then make your webpage look more appealing by adding CSS. You’ll learn the basics of CSS along with its different properties and features.

Debugging or correcting errors in your code is an important practice in any kind of programming. This course elaborates on the various debugging tools and techniques used to make your HTML and CSS code error-free.

Once you’ve learned how to debug your code, you’ll dive deeper into HTML5 and CSS. You’ll insert tables and multimedia, and also embed content in your webpage (which is optional for this course).

You’ll end the course with the basics of page layout. This includes CSS Flexbox (to fit the contents of your webpage on any screen) and CSS Grid (to control the rows and columns in your webpage). Again, there is more information on these if you want to go further, but that’s optional.

How You’ll Learn

This course is broken down into 6 modules. Each module involves 1 to 2 hours of work. The course is taught through a mix of short videos and readings.

Each module has additional explanations, code snippets and ungraded practice questions alongside the usual readings. There’s a good amount of readings in this course that will help you grasp the concepts even better.

At the end of each module, there are a few graded assignments. After you’ve completed everything, you’ll take a final test consisting of 7 graded assignments at the end of the course.

Institution W3C
Provider edX
Instructor Marwa Hussein, Andrew Byrne, Adrian Leven
Level Beginner
Workload 15–20 hours
Enrollments 381K
Certificate Paid

Fun Fact

If you’re interested in this course, you can find more information about the course and how to enroll here.

Archisha Bhar Profile Image

Archisha Bhar

I am a Content Writer at Class Central and a student of Civil Engineering. Other than engineering, I take interest in art, music, computer, psychology and creative writing.

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